lunedì, settembre 24, 2012

Postmodernism Generator

Expressionism in the works of Madonna

Jacques Z. Humphrey Department of Sociolinguistics, University of California
O. Martin Hanfkopf Department of Deconstruction, University of Georgia

1. Madonna and capitalist Marxism

If one examines expressionism, one is faced with a choice: either reject postconstructivist desublimation or conclude that reality serves to oppress the underprivileged. It could be said that Sartre promotes the use of capitalist Marxism to attack the status quo. An abundance of narratives concerning a self-supporting whole may be discovered. “Sexual identity is intrinsically used in the service of capitalism,” says Bataille; however, according to Dietrich[1] , it is not so much sexual identity that is intrinsically used in the service of capitalism, but rather the genre, and eventually the futility, of sexual identity. But the main theme of the works of Madonna is the common ground between class and society. Porter[2] implies that we have to choose between Sontagist camp and the precapitalist paradigm of expression. The primary theme of Parry’s[3] analysis of postconstructivist desublimation is a mythopoetical paradox. Therefore, the characteristic theme of the works of Madonna is the difference between sexual identity and class. Sontag suggests the use of expressionism to deconstruct sexual identity. “Class is part of the stasis of language,” says Debord. But if postconstructivist desublimation holds, the works of Madonna are empowering. Bataille promotes the use of the textual paradigm of narrative to challenge sexism. “Society is elitist,” says Baudrillard; however, according to Tilton[4] , it is not so much society that is elitist, but rather the dialectic, and some would say the rubicon, of society. Therefore, the example of expressionism prevalent in Rushdie’s The Ground Beneath Her Feet emerges again in Midnight’s Children, although in a more precapitalist sense. Dahmus[5] states that we have to choose between cultural theory and neotextual cultural theory. In a sense, Foucault’s critique of capitalist Marxism implies that the Constitution is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy, given that the premise of expressionism is invalid. The main theme of Wilson’s[6] essay on capitalist Marxism is a self-referential totality. Therefore, Derrida uses the term ‘postconstructivist desublimation’ to denote the bridge between art and sexual identity. If capitalist Marxism holds, we have to choose between expressionism and subtextual discourse. But Sontag’s analysis of capitalist Marxism suggests that narrativity is capable of intention. Foucault uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote not, in fact, narrative, but prenarrative. In a sense, Debord suggests the use of postconstructivist desublimation to read and attack society. Capitalist Marxism states that context is a product of the masses. Therefore, in Beverly Hills 90210, Spelling affirms expressionism; in Robin’s Hoods, however, he denies postconstructivist desublimation. McElwaine[7] implies that we have to choose between capitalist Marxism and modern theory. But Sartre promotes the use of expressionism to deconstruct sexism. Several desituationisms concerning Lacanist obscurity exist.

2. Consensuses of paradigm

In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of subtextual culture. Thus, the primary theme of the works of Spelling is a mythopoetical paradox. Debord uses the term ‘postconstructivist desublimation’ to denote the role of the observer as reader. “Sexual identity is elitist,” says Derrida. However, Lyotard suggests the use of capitalist Marxism to modify class. Lacan uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote the absurdity, and subsequent economy, of patriarchial language. Therefore, a number of narratives concerning not discourse, as precapitalist narrative suggests, but neodiscourse may be found. The main theme of McElwaine’s[8] model of capitalist Marxism is the dialectic, and eventually the absurdity, of modernist class. In a sense, an abundance of constructions concerning expressionism exist. Baudrillard promotes the use of capitalist Marxism to attack class divisions. However, any number of discourses concerning the role of the participant as writer may be discovered. If the postdialectic paradigm of discourse holds, we have to choose between capitalist Marxism and textual sublimation.

3. Predeconstructivist desituationism and cultural subcapitalist theory

If one examines capitalist Marxism, one is faced with a choice: either accept expressionism or conclude that government is intrinsically used in the service of sexism. In a sense, Lyotard suggests the use of dialectic capitalism to read and challenge art. An abundance of discourses concerning capitalist Marxism exist. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. However, the subject is contextualised into a Derridaist reading that includes culture as a reality. Marx uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote the common ground between class and truth. In a sense, Bataille promotes the use of neopatriarchialist appropriation to attack archaic, sexist perceptions of society. Any number of dematerialisms concerning the role of the observer as writer may be revealed. However, Lyotard suggests the use of expressionism to analyse sexual identity. Derrida uses the term ‘cultural subcapitalist theory’ to denote the difference between class and sexuality. It could be said that the primary theme of the works of Spelling is the role of the artist as observer. Lacan uses the term ‘capitalist Marxism’ to denote the stasis of textual class.

1. Dietrich, M. Q. ed. (1982) Deconstructing Socialist realism: Capitalist Marxism and expressionism. University of Oregon Press
2. Porter, C. D. C. (1999) Expressionism and capitalist Marxism. Panic Button Books
3. Parry, W. ed. (1988) The Reality of Genre: Capitalist Marxism and expressionism. University of Massachusetts Press
4. Tilton, Y. G. (1992) Capitalist Marxism in the works of Rushdie. Yale University Press
5. Dahmus, U. ed. (1986) Realities of Stasis: Expressionism in the works of Stone. And/Or Press
6. Wilson, B. U. (1970) Capitalist Marxism in the works of Spelling. University of Michigan Press
7. McElwaine, W. P. O. ed. (1985) The Burning House: Expressionism in the works of Cage. Harvard University Press
8. McElwaine, Y. R. (1999) Expressionism and capitalist Marxism. And/Or Press

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